100+ Environmental Groups Call on Hillary Clinton to Oppose Fracking


More than 100 environmental, citizens, and grassroots groups released a letter they sent to Hillary Clinton today urging the former Secretary of State to acknowledge the overwhelming body of recent scientific evidence showing harms from fracking, and to join the growing anti-fracking majority across the nation. The letter notes the disappointment that Clinton touted fracking around the world as Secretary of State, but notes the upsurge in recent evidence including the ban on fracking in her home state of New York based on health impacts.

Signatories included prominent national groups like the Center for Biological Diversity, Food & Water Watch, Progressive Democrats of America, and Rainforest Action Network, as well as leaders of the anti-fracking movement in New York like Mark Ruffalo from the New Yorkers Against Fracking coalition, and various groups from states including Colorado, Ohio, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin.

“A growing majority of Americans oppose fracking and its toxic effects on our health and environment. We’re calling on Hillary Clinton to listen to those voices and the rapidly increasing body of scientific evidence that shows that fracking can’t be done safely. The solution to our energy and economic needs is to swiftly transition to clean, safe renewable energy now,” said Mark Ruffalo, Advisory Board Member of New Yorkers Against Fracking.

“As Secretary of State, Hillary Clinton promoted increased use of fracking around the world, but in the years since she left, a scientific consensus has solidified that clearly demonstrates that fracking threatens our health, communities, and the climate on which we all depend,” said Wenonah Hauter, Executive Director of Food & Water Watch. ”In December Governor Cuomo smartly moved towards banning fracking in New York after reviewing the science. We urge Hillary Clinton to do the same, stand with communities across the country and support a ban on fracking.”

The full text of the letter is available online here.

The letter states, “in light of overwhelming and rapidly increasing scientific evidence of harm, we ask that you now acknowledge the inherent dangers in shale development and stand with us and the countless families and communities at risk from fracking across the nation.”

It points to the significant scientific evidence of harm, including the New York State Department of Health Review that the state’s ban was based on, and more than 400 peer-reviewed studies, which overwhelmingly find risks and harms.

The letter points to water contamination, air pollution, earthquakes, and negative health impacts, and notes that, “These impacts are being borne by far too many Americans across the country.”

The letter also points to the major threat that fracking poses to the climate, and how former Secretary Clinton has been wrong that fracking and natural gas can serve as a bridge to a cleaner energy economy. It notes how dangerous methane leaks from fracking are to the climate, and that it’s clear that natural gas is not a bridge fuel and will certainly only make the climate crisis worse.

The letter states that the “strong leadership” former Secretary Clinton has called for on climate change must mean rejecting fracking and aggressively increasing renewable energy and efficiency.

The letter concludes, “For our health, our water, and our climate, we need the United States to join that list and stop the expansion of fracking. We implore you to listen to the science, listen to the pleas of mothers and fathers who don’t want their children to breathe or drink toxic chemicals, and join the anti-fracking majority. We ask that you join us in taking a stand against fracking, and boldly support a swift transition to renewable energy.”

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JD Sullivan

JD Sullivan is the Editor-in-Chief at Green Action News. He has a Bachelor's degree in Journalism/Mass Communication. JD is passionate about journalism & sustainable living.


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